Sleep and Medicinal Cannabis

INVESTIGATOR: Sean Drummond, Ph.D.

STUDY LOCATION: University of California, San Diego

PROJECT TITLE: Sleep and Medicinal Cannabis

PROJECT TYPE: Clinical Study, Sub-Study

STATUS: COMPLETE

ABSTRACT:

Recently, there has been renewed scientific interest in examining the medical efficacy of cannabis in specific patient populations. For, example, both the Institute of Medicine and the NIH recently reported medicinal cannabis might be useful in the treatment of pain in HIV+ patients. HIV+ patients experience a number of clinical sequelae to the infection, even when they are otherwise considered clinically "asymptomatic." Perhaps one of the earliest sequelae is sleep abnormality. It is estimated that 73% to 90% of HIV+ patients experience significantly disrupted sleep and sleep quality has been shown to predict long-term outcome in HIV+ patients. This study examines the effects of daytime medicinal cannabis administration on subsequent nocturnal subjective and objective measures of sleep in patients with HIV-associated DSPN. We will recruit 15 patients who are enrolled in a study currently funded by the CMCR (PI: Dr. Ellis; Award # C00-SD-104). Dr. Ellis' study examines the efficacy of medicinal cannabis vs. placebo in treating pain in patients with HIV-associated DSPN. Here, subjective sleep will be measured for three 1-week periods: a wash-in week, a week of cannabis administration, and a week of placebo administration. Objective sleep will be studied for two consecutive nights under both cannabis administration and placebo conditions. We hypothesize that, compared to placebo, cannabis will increase slow wave sleep and sleep efficiency and decrease REM sleep. Subjectively, patients will report increased global sleep quality, decreased sleep latency, and increased total sleep time with cannabis administration. If these hypotheses are borne out, it will provide evidence that cannabis has positive medicinal qualities beyond those formally suggested. Improved sleep may directly affect prognosis in these patients and may have several indirect benefits as well. Regardless, this study should provide pilot data for subsequent grant applications focusing on the direct effects of medicinal cannabis on sleep in patient populations.

PUBLICATIONS:

Type:

Title:

Meeting Abstract Lopez, C., Toperoff, W., van den Brande, G., Tapert, S., Atkinson, J.H., Drummond, S.P.A., Increased Sleep Disturbances in Patients with HIV-Related Neuropathy. 2005 Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

Funding Opportunity Announcement

The Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research (CMCR) is seeking to fund primary and pilot cannabis-related studies that further enhance the understanding of the efficacy and adverse effects of cannabis and cannabinoids as pharmacological agents for the treatment of medical and psychiatric disorders, and their potential public health impacts. More information about this funding opportunity, including application instructions and important dates can be found in the request for applications (RFA).


What to Know About the CBD at Your CVS

Marty Munson, Men's Health, April 3, 2019

CVS and Walgreens announced they’re going to sell products containing CBD, best known as the component of marijuana that won’t make you high, in certain stores. CVS is currently selling CBD topicals—creams, sprays, and lotions—in eight states. Walgreens announced its intention to sell CBD products days later, but “isn’t sharing additional details at this time,” according to a spokesperson.

If CBD hadn’t already reached fever pitch, with products like CBD-containing gummies, beer, coffee, eye creams, and even (no kidding) suppositories flooding the market, this announcement legitimizes the compound further.

But market share and the veneer of legitimacy doesn’t mean there’s a lot of clarity around the stuff. Here’s what to know about CBD before you buy:

Read the story here


CBD In Food: Is It Safe (And Legal) To Eat?

Katherine Martinelli, HuffPost, April 2, 2019

Feeling anxious? Down? In pain? Cannabidiol — better known as CBD ― claims to relieve what ails you, or at least that’s the message being broadcast from celebrities to Facebook mom groups across the country.

As state and federal cannabis laws continue to relax, you can now buy CBD in everything from jelly beans to carbonated beverages, often with promises that it will make you happier and healthier. But government agencies at all levels are scrambling to figure out how the ingredient should be regulated, leaving the average consumer confused and often misinformed.

Read the article here


No, CBD-infused jelly beans won’t get you high. Here’s why.

Eli Rosenberg, Washington Post, March 19, 2019

There is CBD beer, and CBD coffee, and CBD gummies and soda, skin care, oils and drops. And now the cannabis-derived product is appearing in jelly beans — designed by the man who created Jelly Belly candies.

The product, a mash-up of an “adult” chemical compound — CBD — and a staple of American childhoods, has been so popular that the company that created it, Spectrum Confections, helmed by Jelly Belly inventor David Klein, sold out after a spate of press coverage over the past week.

“Jelly Belly creator debuts cannabis-infused jelly beans: Toasted marshmallow, mango and more,” USA Today wrote.

Read the story here


Can CBD Help Your Child?

Rachel Rabkin Peachman, Consumer Reports, February 26, 2019

When a child is sick and conventional medicine isn’t helping, parents understandably often turn to alternative treatments. Recently, that includes cannabidiol, aka CBD, which is a cannabis compound found in marijuana and hemp that’s being touted as a remedy for everything from pain and arthritis to seizures and sleep problems. Unlike the cannabis plant’s other well-known compound, THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), CBD does not get users high, it’s nonaddictive, and it has a low risk of side effects—which makes it seem like an appealing option for children.

While CBD is being used widely by adults, the best evidence for it comes from studies focusing on children with certain kinds of epilepsy. And increasingly, parents are giving CBD to their children to manage a range of other conditions, such as autism and anxiety.

Read the article here


Igor Grant, MD

Marijuana as Medicine: Can We See Past the Smoke?
North American Cannabis Summit presentation January 2019 (PDF)


Igor Grant, MD

Introduction/Overview
CMCR Symposium, June 2018


Daniele Piomelli, MD, PhD, PharmD

The health impact of cannabis
CMCR Symposium, June 2018


Ziva Cooper, PhD

Therapeutic potential of cannabis for pain alone and as an adjunct to opioids
CMCR Symposium, June 2018


Iain McGregor, PhD

Medicinal cannabis research down under: Introducing the Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics
CMCR Symposium, June 2018


Thomas Marcotte, PhD

Cannabis and public safety: The challenge of cannabis-impaired driving
CMCR Symposium, June 2018


Ryan Vandrey, PhD

What's in real-world cannabis?
CMCR Symposium, June 2018


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