CMCR

Is it time to legalize marijuana in sports?

Stefanie Loh, San Diego Union Tribune, August 1, 2015

You’ve seen the ubiquitous prescription drug commercials on television.

A happy couple walks hand-in-hand along an isolated beach as the sun sets in the background. The drug name flashes across the screen. Cue a voiceover listing all the possible side effects – always in staccato speed because, well, the number of possible side effects is long enough that it would take a while to get through them all at regular pace.

Kyle Turley was watching one of those commercials earlier this year when he decided enough was enough. He was done with synthetic drugs.

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Major Pot Research Barrier Goes Up in Smoke

U.S. News & World Report, June 22, 2015

Medical marijuana advocates and researchers are celebrating a surprise decision by the Obama administration to scrap reviews that delayed – sometimes for years – private and state-funded research into marijuana’s medical value.

Researchers will no longer need to submit proposed pot studies to the U.S. Public Health Service for review, ending a hurdle that does not exist for research of other drugs listed as Schedule I substances – the controversial federal classification that puts marijuana alongside LSD and ecstasy.

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Welcome to the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research


Welcome to the University of California's Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research (CMCR). The purpose of the Center is to coordinate rigorous scientific studies to assess the safety and efficacy of cannabis and cannabis compounds for treating medical conditions. The CMCR is the result of Senate Bills SB 847 (Vasconcellos, 1999) and SB 295 (2003), passed by the State Legislature and signed into law by Governor Gray Davis. The legislation enabled a program overseeing objective, high quality medical research that will "enhance understanding of the efficacy and adverse effects of marijuana as a pharmacological agent," stressing that the project "should not be construed as encouraging or sanctioning the social or recreational use of marijuana".

 

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How Effective Is Medical Marijuana? Here's A Closer Look At 14 Different Uses

MSN, April 23, 2015

Whether you're in the camp to legalize marijuana or would rather keep it restricted (no judging, here!), it's high time to size up its medical claims. Pot pre-dates the Egyptian pyramids—but it took till now for 23 states to give their A-Okay for its medicinal use. Prevention asked top docs whether cannabis, med-speak for marijuana, is actually helpful (or at least promising) for nearly two dozen health woes ranging from multiple sclerosis to migraines, cancer pain to epilepsy.

Two things to keep in mind as you're reading: Most of the research involves marijuana or its individual psychoactive compounds administered in carefully measured doses—a far cry from the variability in strains being sold on the street or even in dispensaries. "That's the equivalent of buying penicillin at a flea market," contends Igor Grant, MD, chair of the department of psychiatry at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine. And there's just not a lot of research yet, period. The FDA hasn't removed marijuana from its "schedule-one" drug designation, which it reserves for substances that have no acceptable medical use. "Few doctors have the special permission required to work with schedule-one drugs," notes Otis Brawley, MD, chief medical and scientific officer of the American Cancer Society. "Cocaine is less restricted than marijuana."

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