CMCR

How Effective Is Medical Marijuana? Here's A Closer Look At 14 Different Uses

MSN, April 23, 2015

Whether you're in the camp to legalize marijuana or would rather keep it restricted (no judging, here!), it's high time to size up its medical claims. Pot pre-dates the Egyptian pyramids—but it took till now for 23 states to give their A-Okay for its medicinal use. Prevention asked top docs whether cannabis, med-speak for marijuana, is actually helpful (or at least promising) for nearly two dozen health woes ranging from multiple sclerosis to migraines, cancer pain to epilepsy.

Two things to keep in mind as you're reading: Most of the research involves marijuana or its individual psychoactive compounds administered in carefully measured doses—a far cry from the variability in strains being sold on the street or even in dispensaries. "That's the equivalent of buying penicillin at a flea market," contends Igor Grant, MD, chair of the department of psychiatry at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine. And there's just not a lot of research yet, period. The FDA hasn't removed marijuana from its "schedule-one" drug designation, which it reserves for substances that have no acceptable medical use. "Few doctors have the special permission required to work with schedule-one drugs," notes Otis Brawley, MD, chief medical and scientific officer of the American Cancer Society. "Cocaine is less restricted than marijuana."

Click here to read the rest of the story.


 

San Diego Scientist Clears Haze On Medical Marijuana

KPBS, March 3, 2015

When voters passed Proposition 215 in 1996, California became the first state to legalize medical pot. There was only one problem. Scientists still hadn't firmly established marijuana's effectiveness as medicine.

Some state legislators wanted to change that. They approached UC San Diego psychiatrist Igor Grant. "My recommendation was, look, establish a center to study this," said Grant, who'd previously looked into whether moderate marijuana use causes long-term brain damage (conclusion: it doesn't).

Click here to read the rest of the story and watch the program.


 

Welcome to the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research


Welcome to the University of California's Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research (CMCR). The purpose of the Center is to coordinate rigorous scientific studies to assess the safety and efficacy of cannabis and cannabis compounds for treating medical conditions. The CMCR is the result of Senate Bills SB 847 (Vasconcellos, 1999) and SB 295 (2003), passed by the State Legislature and signed into law by Governor Gray Davis. The legislation enabled a program overseeing objective, high quality medical research that will "enhance understanding of the efficacy and adverse effects of marijuana as a pharmacological agent," stressing that the project "should not be construed as encouraging or sanctioning the social or recreational use of marijuana".

 

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American Association for the Advancement of Science

Igor Grant, MD, participated in a symposium on medicinal cannabis at the 2015 meeting of the American Association for Advancement of Science in San Jose California on 2/14/15.

Click here for audio from the interview.


 
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